SchoolCycle

Ella ya emprendió su viaje. Con una bicicleta, la ayudas a llegar más lejos.

Through the SchoolCycle program, Girl Up aims to help eliminate one of the biggest obstacles keeping girls out of school: distance. Con una bicicleta, pueden recibir la educación que necesitan para crear un futuro mejor.

Guatemala

SchoolCycle Guatemala

En 2015, Girl Up llevó SchoolCycle a Guatemala. Cuando el Fondo de Población de las Naciones Unidas (UNFPA) notó el éxito de SchoolCycle en Malaui, le solicitó a Girl Up que también financiara bicicletas para las jóvenes en Guatemala, en el departamento de Petén, una zona en el norte de Guatemala con una alta proporción de pueblos indígenas ubicados en zonas rurales. Girl Up supporters raised enough money for 250 bicycles, which were distributed in February 2017.

Bicycles were provided to girls who were out-of-school but now have the opportunity to enroll in a second chance program, focusing on 30 isolated communities that do not have secondary schools. To support the girls who received new bicycles, program mentors made visits every 4-6 weeks to both girls’ homes and study centers to ensure girls were using their bicycles and advancing their studies, as well as help maintain and repair bicycles if needed.

The bicycles made a big impact for girls in Guatemala. They helped increase school reenrolled by 24% from 2016 to 2017, and 97% of bicycle recipients completed the 2017 school year and intend to continue their studies in the future. An analysis from UNFPA of the impact of the bikes showed that girls want to continue studying when they have the means of transportation to get to their study centers easily and safely.

SchoolCycle was also powerful in transforming social norms at the community level, with the visibility of groups of girls biking to school together. Adolescent girls who received a bicycle increased their mobility and autonomy, an empowerment dimension that enabled them to access basic education, health, reproductive and financial services within and outside their communities. In fact, 51% of participants substantially increased their mobility with their bicycle. This allowed girls to continue their secondary studies, strengthen their social capital, and have access to recreational activities.